Displaced Scholars

Salomon – Singer

233.) Salomon, Richard (1933-1939, 1940-1944) Kenyon College (Oh.) / History

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234.) Salz, Arthur (1933-1944) Ohio State / Economics

“Arthur Salz, Professor of Economics, who later taught at Ohio State University” * Karl Mannheim and the legacy of Max Weber: retrieving a research … “Arthur Salz, a liberal controversialist and economist of the Weimar years, … stands in contrast to Arthur Salz’s perennially empty economics classes at …” books.google.com/books?id=FO_foLOCQbsC&pg=PA180&lpg=PA180&dq=%22Arthur+Salz%22+%2B+economics&source=bl&ots=Z2FuCfBKSo&sig=fiHFCuvI_rImzTVaztKZCJGWwIo&hl=en * “THE PRESENT POSITION OF ECONOMICS By ARTHUR SALZ Ohio State University I One hundred years ago, in 1842 to be exact, Alfred Marshall was born, …”

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235.) Scheerer, Martin (1934-1944) College of City of NY / Psychology

Phenomenology in Psychology and Psychiatry: A Historical Introduction “7” Thus he begins with the study of the common-sense psychology of interpersonal … Martin Scheerer (1900-1961) Another student of William Stern’s, Martin …” books.google.com/books?id=s_UlCHLDawoC&pg=PA82&lpg=PA82&dq=Martin+Scheerer+%2B+psychology&source=bl&ots=ujYK-5F42_&sig=d-3u9np1Lvaa3y2MmHB3XhX7-pU&hl=en 2. A history of modern experimental psychology: from James and Wundt … “… Hans Wallach, and Martin Scheerer. In the following, I discuss … players in the transition of German psychology to the United States.6 Foremost in the …” books.google.com/books?id=2mQAQBU2utcC&pg=PA148&lpg=PA148&dq=Martin+Scheerer+%2B+psychology&source=bl&ots=rf-J2vfh_a&sig=AE2yKdbYjzdUhSZ67KpLPPgMH3g&hl=en 3. Martin Scheerer (b.1900, d.1961) – Curriculum vitae (CV) “27 Feb 2006 … Dr. Martin Scheerer (b.1900, d.1961), ( Prev | Next ). POSITION(S) / JOB TITLE(S ): AREAS OF EXPERTISE: psychology, psychodiagnostics …” http://www.getcited.org/mbrz/11102635 . Levy (1943) Some aspects of the schizophrenic formal disturbance … “[ 11 | 0 ], Goldstein, Kurt; Scheerer, Martin. (1941) Abstract and concrete behavior: An … (1936) Principles of topological psychology 1st edition. …” http://www.getcited.org/refs/PP/1/PUB/103404906 Martin Scheerer Memorial meetings on cognitive psychology (May … “Cognition, theory, research, promise by Martin Scheerer Memorial meetings on cognitive psychology (May 1962 University of Kansas). (Harper and Row, 1964) …” openlibrary.org/a/OL5911643A Martin Scheerer Memorial Meetings on Cognitive Psychology (1962 … “Cognition: theory, research, promise by Martin Scheerer Memorial Meetings on Cognitive Psychology (1962 University of Kansas). (Harper & Row, 1964) …” openlibrary.org/a/OL2204448A/Martin-Scheerer-Memorial-Meetings-on-Cognitive-Psychology-(1962-University-of-Kansas) Gestalt Archive : Gestalt theory and Gestalt psychology articles … “10 Jul 2006 … Gestalt Archive: full text Gestalt psychology and Gestalt theory articles online . … by Kurt GOLDSTEIN and Martin SCHEERER (1941) …” gestalttheory.net/archive/ A.S. Luchins & E.H. Luchins: ISOMORPHISM IN GESTALT THEORY (2) “Psychology and physiology are similar because of association due to past experience. … Martin SCHEERER, a seminar member who had joined the discussion, …” gestalttheory.net/archive/luch_iso2.html Martin Scheerer – Email, Address, Phone number, everything … “Everything you need to know about Martin Scheerer Email addresses, Phone numbers , Biography, Gestalt psychology, Connector, Gestalt, My Company , Hypnosis.” http://www.123people.com/s/martin+scheerer Neuropsychology in New York City (1930-1960) — Goldstein 24 (2 … “12 May 2009 … Martin Scheerer had left CCNY but had organized the experimental psychology course and so I was initially influenced by him at a distance, …” acn.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/full/24/2/137 Neuropsychology in New York City (1930–1960) “12 May 2009 … Martin Scheerer had left CCNY but had organized the experimental psychology course and so I was initially influenced by …” acn.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/reprint/24/2/137.pdf Strand Bookstore: [search] author (Reiff, Robert; Martin Scheerer) “by Robert Reiff; Martin Scheerer. PUBLISHER INTERNATIONAL UNIVERSITIES PRE , © 1959. ISBN-10 1299567061. ISBN-13 9781299567061. FORMAT Hardcover. PSYCHOLOGY …” http://www.strandbooks.com/app/www/p/qsearch?author=Reiff%2C+Robert%3B+Martin+Scheerer Strand Bookstore: Memory and Hypnotic Age Regression: Devel…; by … “by Robert Reiff; Martin Scheerer. PUBLISHER. INTERNATIONAL UNIVERSITIES PRE. © 1959. ISBN-10 1299567061. ISBN-13 9781299567061. FORMAT Hardcover. PSYCHOLOGY …” http://www.strandbooks.com/app/www/p/profile/?isbn=1299567061 Libraries Australia – Cognition : theory, research, promise … “Title: Cognition : theory, research, promise : papers read at the Martin Scheerer Memorial Meetings on Cognitive Psychology, University of Kansas, May, …” nla.gov.au/anbd.bib-an9663476 An Interesting Career in Psychology: Medical Error Consultant “This Interesting Careers in Psychology article illustrates an example of a … ( KU) where I had the privilege of studying with Martin Scheerer, Herb Wright, …” http://www.apa.org/science/ic-bogner.html Academic Lineage of the Department of Psychology, University of … “Martin Scheerer. 1900-1961 -. Oxford University. John Dewey. 1859-1952 … Boring and used in his classic book History, psychology, …” http://www.uvm.edu/~psych/images/Dewey_Hall/people/lineage_19x27.pdf Measurement Educational and Psychological “memory of Martin Scheerer. The topic of their meetings was. Cognitive. Psychology and their papers, edited by. Constance. Scheerer, provide …” pm.sagepub.com/cgi/reprint/24/4/991.pdf Athenaeum Reading Room Isomorphism in Gestalt Theory: Comparison … “Next we turn to Martin SCHEERER (1954) who, in a section on Gestalt psychology in a chapter on cognitive theory, raised the question of what determines the …” evans-experientialism.freewebspace.com/luchins04.htm Gestalt Theoretical Psychology “6 Apr 2005 … Sources for Gestalt Therapy and Gestalt Psychology around the world … Abstract and Concrete Behavior, by Kurt Goldstein & Martin Scheerer …” http://www.sonoma.edu/people/daniels/gestalt1.html Goldstein Scheerer Object Sort Test – Psychology Wiki

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236.) Schoenberger, Guido (1933-1934, 1938-1944) Inst. of Fine Arts (NYC) / History of Art

Jewish Ceremonial Art, edited by Stephen S. Kayser and Guido … “AMONG Jewish historians and theologians nowadays one often encounters the notion that the plastic arts were never a particular concern of the Jewish people, …”http://www.commentarymagazine.com/viewarticle.cfm/jewish-ceremonial-art–edited-by-stephen-s–kayser-and-guido-schoenberger-3152 Jewish Ceremonial Art, edited by Stephen S. Kayser “Wooden Synagogues, by Maria and Kazimierz Piechotka July 1960. Jewish Ceremonial Art, edited by Stephen S. Kayser and Guido Schoenberger December 1959 …” http://www.commentarymagazine.com/viewarticle.cfm/jewish-ceremonial-art–edited-by-stephen-s–kayser-2404

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237.) Schuhmann, Alfred (1933-1934, 1937-1945) ‘Cedar Rapids, Iowa’ / Philosophy

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238.) Schwarz, Heinrich (1940-1944) Rhode Island School of Design / History of Art

Schwarz, Heinrich (1894-1974), Austrian-born American art historian. He became interested in early photography while a curator at the Belvedere Gallery, Vienna, and in 1929 organized an exhibition of 180 calotypes by D. O. Hill and Robert Adamson. His book David Octavius Hill, Meister der Photographie (1931; Eng. 1931) was the first monograph on a photographer by an art historian. He held various curatorial and academic posts in the USA after settling there in 1940. His particular concerns were painters’ use of pre-photographic imaging devices; and what he perceived as a ‘proto-photographic’ vision (abandonment of classical compositional conventions, and fascination with the details of everyday things) developing among early 19th-century artists. http://www.answers.com/topic/heinrich-schwarz

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239.) Schwenger, Rudolf (1939-1944) College of St. Thomas / Economics

Nazism, fascism and the working class “Thus, for example, in 1932 Rudolf Schwenger was still writing relatively sensibly about the limits of industrial social policy, but one can already hear the …” books.google.com/books?id=e0Rz1ciobugC&pg=PA95&lpg=PA95&dq=Rudolf+Schwenger&source=bl&ots=OTe_n3Eh58&sig=7XfS_8GNaP6AqmX7K3sZmxPcHi8&hl=en

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240.) Selig, Anna (1933-1935, 1939-1944) Int’l Inst. Democratic Reconstruction Center, NYC / Education

My Travel Diary. 1936: Between Two Worlds “Anna Selig has great plans for Vienna. She has rented a beautiful old …… She staunchly opposes the intrusion of the total state into education and other …” http://www.religion-online.org/showchapter.asp?title=3181&C=2681 Shapley, Harlow, 1885-1972. Papers of Harlow Shapley, 1906-1966 … “American Association for an International Office for Education [AAIOE]. May 1944 – Sept 1944 …. International Study Center (Dr. Anna Selig) …” oasis.lib.harvard.edu/oasis/deliver/~hua03998

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241.) Sell, Friedrich Carl (1937-1944) Mt. Holyoke College (Mass) / Language & Literature

JModHist 1, 1929-25, 1953 “Friedrich Carl SELL, Intellectual Liberalism in Germany about 1900 [ Historiographical Article], in: JModHist 15, 1943, p. 227. Reviews of Books, p. 237 …” http://www.fordham.edu/mvst/magazinestacks/jmodhist.html

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242.) Siegel, Carl Ludwig (1934-1944) Inst. for Advanced Study / Mathematics

Carl Ludwig Siegel (18961981) was a mathematician specialising in number theory.

Siegel was born in Berlin, where he enrolled at the Humboldt University in Berlin in 1915 as a student in mathematics, astronomy, and physics. Amongst his teachers were Max Planck and Ferdinand Georg Frobenius, whose influence made the young Siegel abandon astronomy and turn towards number theory instead.

In 1917 he was drafted into the German Army and had to interrupt his studies. After the end of World War I, he enrolled at the Georg-August University of Göttingen, studying under Edmund Landau, who was his doctoral thesis supervisor (Ph.D. in 1920). He stayed in Göttingen as a teaching and research assistant; many of his groundbreaking results were published during this period. In 1922, he was appointed professor at the Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universität of Frankfurt am Main.

Career

In 1938, he returned to Göttingen before emigrating in 1940 via Norway to the United States, where he joined the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton University, where he had already spent a sabbatical in 1935. He returned to Göttingen only after World War II, when he accepted a post as professor in 1951, which he kept until his retirement in 1959.

Siegel’s work on number theory and diophantine equations and celestial mechanics in particular won him numerous honours. In 1978, he was awarded the Wolf Prize in Mathematics, one of the most prestigious in the field.

Siegel’s work spans analytic number theory; and his theorem on the finiteness of the integer points of curves, for genus > 1, is historically important as a major general result on diophantine equations, when the field was essentially undeveloped. He worked on L-functions, discovering the (presumed illusory) Siegel zero phenomenon. His work derived from the Hardy-Littlewood circle method on quadratic forms proved very influential on the later, adele group theories encompassing the use of theta-functions. The Siegel modular forms are recognised as part of the moduli theory of abelian varieties. In all this work the structural implications of analytic methods show through.

Speaker at International Congress 1936 LMS Honorary Member 1956 Wolf Prize 1978 Academic advisors: Edmund Landau * Undoubtedly, whoever had specific knowledge about the Manhattan Project would have … Herman Weyl, Carl Ludwig Siegel, Ostwald Veblen, James Alexander, …” * “The work on the Manhattan Project has been described in …. famous number theorist Carl Ludwig Siegel to object that he …” http://www.iop.org/EJ/article/1063-7869/47/12/A07/PHU_47_12_A07.pdf * “He is best known for his role as the scientific director of the Manhattan Project,. …. Carl Ludwig Siegel (December 31, 1896 – April 4, …” * Ferenc Morton szasz, British Scientists and the Manhattan Project The losalamos Years …. PAUL EPSTEIN, ERNST HELLINGER, CARL LUDWIG SIEGEL und otto szasz. …” www.geometry.net/scientists/szasz_otto_page_no_4.php

Carl Ludwig Siegel (December 31, 1896April 4, 1981) was a German mathematician specialising in number theory. December 31 is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. … 1896 (MDCCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). … April 4 is the 94th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (95th in leap years). … 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. … Leonhard Euler is considered by many people to be one of the greatest mathematicians of all time A mathematician is a person whose primary area of study and research is mathematics. … To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. …

He was born in Berlin, where he enrolled at the Humboldt University in Berlin in 1915 as a student in mathematics, astronomy, and physics. Amongst his teachers were Max Planck and Ferdinand Georg Frobenius, whose influence made the young Siegel abandon astronomy and turn towards number theory instead. For other uses, see Berlin (disambiguation). … Alternative meaning: Humboldt State University, located in Arcata, California Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin The Humboldt University of Berlin (German Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin) is the successor to Berlins oldest university, the Friedrich Wilhelm University (Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität), founded in 1810 by the liberal Prussian educational reformer… 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). … Euclid, detail from The School of Athens by Raphael. … Radio telescopes are among many different tools used by astronomers Astronomy (Greek: αστρονομία = άστρον + νόμος, astronomia = astron + nomos, literally, law of the stars) is the science of celestial objects and phenomena that originate outside the Earths atmosphere, such as stars, planets, comets, auroras, galaxies, and the cosmic background radiation. … Physics (from the Greek, φυσικός (physikos), natural, and φύσις (physis), nature) is the science of the natural world, which deals with the fundamental constituents of the universe, the forces they exert on one another, and the results of these forces. … Max Planck Max Karl Ernst Ludwig Planck (April 23, 1858 — October 4, 1947) was one of the most important German physicists of the late 19th and early 20th century; he is considered to be the founder of quantum theory. … Picture of Frobenius Ferdinand Georg Frobenius (October 26, 1849 – August 3, 1917) was a German mathematician, best-known for his contributions to the theory of differential equations and to group theory. …

In 1917 he was drafted into the German Army and had to interrupt his studies. After the end of World War I, he enrolled at the University of Göttingen, studying under Edmund Landau, who was his doctoral thesis supervisor (Ph.D. in 1920). He stayed in Göttingen as a teaching and research assistant; many of his groundbreaking results were published during this period. In 1922, he was appointed professor at the University of Frankfurt. 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. … The German Army (German: Heer ) is one of three defence units forming the Bundeswehr (Federal Defence Forces) of the Federal Republic of Germany. … Combatants Allies: Serbia, Russia, France, Romania, Belgium, British Empire, United States, Italy, and others Central Powers: Germany, Austria-Hungary, Bulgaria, Ottoman Empire Casualties Military dead: 5 million Civilian deaths: 3 million Total of dead: 8 million Military dead: 4 million Civilian deaths: 3 million Total dead: 7 million The First… The Georg-August University of Göttingen (Georg-August-Universität Göttingen, often called the Georgia Augusta) was founded in 1734 by George II, King of Great Britain and Elector of Hanover, and opened in 1737. … Edmund Georg Hermann Landau (February 14, 1877 – February 19, 1938) was a German mathematician and author of over 250 papers on number theory. … Doctor of Philosophy, or Ph. … 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar) // Events January January 7 – Forces of Russian White admiral Kolchak surrender in Krasnoyarsk. … 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). … University of Frankfurt may refer to two (or three) German universities: the Johann Wolfgang Goethe University Frankfurt am Main (Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main) in Frankfurt am Main the European University Viadrina Frankfurt (Oder) (Europa-Universität Viadrina Frankfurt (Oder)) in Frankfurt (Oder), or its historical predecessor which existed…

In 1938, he returned to Göttingen before emigrating in 1940 via Norway to the U.S., where he joined the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton University, where he had already spent a sabbatical in 1935. He returned to Göttingen only after World War II, when he accepted a post as professor in 1951, which he kept until his retirement in 1959. 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). … Göttingen ( ) is a city in Lower Saxony, Germany. … 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1940 calendar). … Motto: E pluribus unum (1789 to 1956) (Latin: Out of Many, One) In God We Trust (1956 to present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at federal level; English de facto Government • President • Vice President Federal Republic George… Princeton University is a coeducational private university located on an extensive campus in and around suburban Princeton, New Jersey. … A sabbatical year is a prolonged hiatus, typically one year, in the career of an otherwise successful individual taken in order to fulfill some dream, e. … 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). … Combatants Allies: Poland, British Commonwealth, France/Free France, Soviet Union, United States, China, and others Axis Powers: Germany, Italy, Japan, and others Casualties Military dead: 17 million Civilian dead: 33 million Total dead: 50 million Military dead: 8 million Civilian dead: 4 million Total dead: 12 million World War II… The meaning of the word professor (Latin: one who claims publicly to be an expert) varies. … 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday; see its calendar. … 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. …

Siegel’s work on number theory and diophantine equations and celestial mechanics in particular won him numerous honours. In 1978, he was awarded the Wolf Prize in Mathematics, one of the most prestigious in the field. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. … In mathematics, a Diophantine equation is a polynomial equation that only allows the variables to be integers. … Celestial mechanics is a division of astronomy dealing with the motions and gravitational effects of celestial objects. … 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (the link is to a full 1978 calendar). … Past winners of the Wolf Prize in Mathematics: 1978 Israel M. Gelfand, Carl L. Siegel 1979 Jean Leray, André Weil 1980 Henri Cartan, Andrei Kolmogorov 1981 Lars Ahlfors, Oscar Zariski 1982 Hassler Whitney, Mark Grigoryevich Krein 1983/4 Shiing S. Chern, Paul ErdÅ‘s 1984/5 Kunihiko Kodaira, Hans…

Siegel’s work spans analytic number theory; and his theorem on the finiteness of the integer points of curves, for genus > 1, is historically important as a major general result on diophantine equations, when the field was essentially undeveloped. He worked on L-functions, discovering the (presumed illusory) Siegel zero phenomenon. His work derived from the Hardy-Littlewood circle method on quadratic forms proved very influential on the later, adele group theories encompassing the use of theta-functions. The Siegel modular forms are recognised as part of the moduli theory of abelian varieties. In all this work the structural implications of analytic methods show through. Analytic number theory is the branch of number theory that uses methods from mathematical analysis. … A theorem is a proposition that has been or is to be proved on the basis of explicit assumptions. … In mathematics, Siegels theorem on integral points is the 1929 result of Carl Ludwig Siegel, that for an algebraic curve C of genus g defined over a number field K, presented in affine space in a given coordinate system, there are only finitely many points on C with coordinates… In mathematics, the genus has few different meanings Topology The genus of a connected, oriented surface is an integer representing the maximum number of cuttings along closed simple curves without rendering the resultant manifold disconnected. … The theory of L-functions has become a very substantial, and still largely conjectural, part of contemporary number theory. … In mathematics, more specifically in the field of analytic number theory, a Siegel zero, named after Carl Ludwig Siegel, is a type of potential counterexample to the Grand Riemann hypothesis, on the zeroes of Dirichlet L-function. … In mathematics, the Hardy-Littlewood circle method is one of the most frequently used techniques of analytic number theory. … In mathematics, a quadratic form is a homogeneous polynomial of degree two in a number of variables. … In mathematics, an adelic algebraic group is a topological group defined by an algebraic group G over a number field K, and the adele ring A = A(K) of K. It consists of the points of G having values in A; the definition of the appropriate topology is straightforward only… In mathematics, theta functions are special functions of several complex variables. … In algebraic geometry, the moduli problem is to describe the parameters on which algebraic varieties depend. … For the purposes of algebraic geometry over the complex numbers, an abelian variety is a complex torus (a torus of real dimension 2n that is a complex manifold) that is also a projective algebraic variety of dimension n, i. …

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243.) Singer, Rolf (1939-1944) Harvard / Mycology

ROLF SINGER, 1906-1994
PAPERS, 1923-1954

Biographical Note: Mycologist Rolf Singer was born June 23, 1906 in Schliersee, Bavaria. After receiving his Ph.D. at the University of Vienna in 1931 he worked in Munich. By 1933, however, Singer was forced to flee Nazi Germany to Vienna. There he met his wife, Martha Singer. From Vienna, Singer and his wife went to Barcelona, Spain, where Singer was appointed Assistant Professor at the Autonomous University. Persecution by the Spanish authorities on behalf of the German government forced Singer to leave Spain for France in 1934. After a fellowship at the Museum d’Histoire Naturelle in Paris, Singer again moved, this time to Leningrad, where he was Senior Scientific Expert at the Botanical Garden of the Academy of Sciences of the USSR. During his time at the Academy, Singer made many expeditions to Siberia, the Altai Mountains, and Karelia. In 1941, Singer emigrated to the United States. He was offered a position at the Farlow Herbarium as a research associate, then as Assistant Curator, then as acting Curator following the death of Dr. David Linder. He spent a total of seven years at the Farlow. During this time, Singer also received a Guggenheim Fellowship for studies in Florida, and taught at the Mountain Lake Biological Station of the University of Virginia.

In 1948, Singer left Harvard to become professor at the Universidad Nacional de Tucuman in Argentina. Later, in 1961, Singer became professor at the Universidad de Buenos Aires. During his time in South America, Singer, his wife, and his daughter Heidi collected extensively. Singer’s last faculty appointment was at the University of Illinois at Chicago Circle, from 1968 to 1977.

Singer was a prolific writer, with more than 400 publications to his name. He was also known for his eagerness to aid other botanists, whether they were professionals or amateurs. He died in 1994.

Sources used: Mueller, Gregory M. “Rolf Singer, 1906-1994.” Mycologia, 87, no. 1 (1995): 144-147. / Singer, Martha. “Glancing Back.” Sydowia beiheft 8 (1979): 14-25. / Singer, Rolf. “Curriculum Vitae” http://www.huh.harvard.edu/Libraries/archives/Singer.htm

Rolf Singer (19061994) was a German-born mycologist and one of the most important taxonomists of gilled mushrooms (agarics) in the 20th century.

After receiving his Ph.D. at the University of Vienna in 1931 he worked in Munich. By 1933, however, Singer was forced to flee Nazi Germany to Vienna. There he met his wife, Martha Singer. From Vienna, Singer and his wife went to Barcelona, Spain, where Singer was appointed Assistant Professor at the Autonomous University. Persecution by the Spanish authorities on behalf of the German government forced Singer to leave Spain for France in 1934. After a fellowship at the Museum d’Histoire Naturelle in Paris, Singer again moved, this time to Leningrad, where he was Senior Scientific Expert at the Botanical Garden of the Academy of Sciences of the USSR. During his time at the Academy, Singer made many expeditions to Siberia, the Altai Mountains, and Karelia. In 1941, Singer emigrated to the United States. He was offered a position at the Farlow Herbarium as a research associate, then as Assistant Curator, then as acting Curator following the death of Dr. David Linder. He spent a total of seven years at the Farlow. During this time, Singer also received a Guggenheim Fellowship for studies in Florida, and taught at the Mountain Lake Biological Station of the University of Virginia.

In 1948, Singer left Harvard to become professor at the Universidad Nacional de Tucuman in Argentina. Later, in 1961, Singer became professor at the Universidad de Buenos Aires. During his time in South America, Singer, his wife, and his daughter Heidi collected extensively. Singer’s last faculty appointment was at the University of Illinois at Chicago Circle, from 1968 to 1977.

Singer was a prolific writer, with more than 400 publications to his name. He was also known for his eagerness to aid other botanists, whether they were professionals or amateurs. He wrote major books like “The Agaricales in Modern Taxonomy“. He fled to various countries during the Nazi period, pursuing mycology in far-flung places like the Soviet Union, Argentina, and finally the United States, as mycologist at the Field Museum in Chicago.

The standard author abbreviation Singer is used to indicate this individual as the author when citing a botanical name. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rolf_Singer

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